Mertyn's Mind

My inspiration blog... for my art go to m3rtyn.tumblr.com

untamableshipper asked: Hi! Do you have any tips on drawing body figures? Especially the length of the legs? And do you have tips on drawing hands? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Only way to learn figures is to look at them and draw them.  I’ve taken figure drawing and anatomy for artist classes in addition to drawing a lot.  Take them if you can!  And I fuck up legs more than anything because I don’t draw them enough.  Easy springboard though is searching for Andrew Loomis books.

Same with hands, though there are some fairly easy to describe formulas for hands so I drew up a couple rq

First of all, for probably 90% of the hand poses you’re gonna draw, think fingers like the petals on a pinwheel.  They all curve the same degree, in relation to the previous.  

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freeglassart asked: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

m3rtyn:

So, first things first. A big thank you to all those who check out and follow my blog you guys are the best. A lot has happened in this 2nd year of my blog. Finishing up my Illustration degree at University and getting a First (somehow), I made my debut Indie Comic Aurora Atlasand going to a Comic convention this weekend (13/09/2014-14/09/2014) to sell my comic and other art work along with my friend Natasha Kingham.
For the future, well apart from finding a job to pay off my 'luxury' lifestyle. I’m going to continue as normal and upload my sketches and artwork on a daily basis, I’ll take on the Inktober challenge again this year, I am currently making plans for writing some reviews/personal opinions on stuff (like graphic novels, movies, games, animation/anime, etc) and I might spend time and setup a society 6 shop or something like that.
Anyway, I got to get things ready for N.I.C.E. which should be good. I will try my best to remember to take photos of the weekend most likely use Instagram for that (If it has Wi-Fi). If you are able to come to the event at Bedford (UK), that would be awesome.
Speak to you next time…
LATES!!!

m3rtyn:

So, first things first. A big thank you to all those who check out and follow my blog you guys are the best. A lot has happened in this 2nd year of my blog. Finishing up my Illustration degree at University and getting a First (somehow), I made my debut Indie Comic Aurora Atlasand going to a Comic convention this weekend (13/09/2014-14/09/2014) to sell my comic and other art work along with my friend Natasha Kingham.

For the future, well apart from finding a job to pay off my 'luxury' lifestyle. I’m going to continue as normal and upload my sketches and artwork on a daily basis, I’ll take on the Inktober challenge again this year, I am currently making plans for writing some reviews/personal opinions on stuff (like graphic novels, movies, games, animation/anime, etc) and I might spend time and setup a society 6 shop or something like that.

Anyway, I got to get things ready for N.I.C.E. which should be good. I will try my best to remember to take photos of the weekend most likely use Instagram for that (If it has Wi-Fi). If you are able to come to the event at Bedford (UK), that would be awesome.

Speak to you next time…

LATES!!!

ziggy9911 asked: Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

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Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

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And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

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Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

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Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

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Layered, interior spaces:

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You get the idea.

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Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

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Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

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4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

m3rtyn:

Only few more days till N.I.C.E. Might see you then. #illustration #sketch #doodle #event #comic #comics

m3rtyn:

Only few more days till N.I.C.E. Might see you then. #illustration #sketch #doodle #event #comic #comics

!!!GOING TO N.I.C.E. 2014!!!

m3rtyn:

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So, Me and Natasha Kingham have our own stall at N.I.C.E (Northampton International Comic Expo) which is on the 13th and 14th September in Bedford. I will be selling my comic Aurora Atlas and other cool stuff as well. So, if you live in the UK and able to get to Bedford go check out N.I.C.E. in September.

I might see you guys then.

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elioli-art:

sketchinfun:

Long post of sketches from tonight’s stream. Felt like drawing a style guide in response to the positive response to my recent GOTG sketches. I am still developing my style, and it changes constantly, like month to month, but here are some elements that are consistent in my style. Enjoy!

guide belongs to http://sketchinfun.tumblr.com/

Go follow Karina! Love her work. :)

And you can follow our art inspiration tumblr to see stuff we like!

glassshard:

stephenmccranie:

Do you ever feel like you have to wage war against yourself to force yourself to get things done?

This comics essay is part of a book called Brick by Brick, which I am now raising money to self publish on Kickstarter! Please check out the link for more details!

In other words, if you have to draw a boring comic scene, add boy butts (or girl butts) or interesting monsters or lots of blood to make it more fun for yourself.

(via spx)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - SHORTHANDS

It’s crucial to find ways to draw characters clearly and fast when storyboarding. Line mileage alone can become an impossible mountain to climb if you don’t simplify the way you draw characters. Leave all details aside and find the essence of a character. Shorthands are the gesture drawings of storyboarding. Specific characters have specific attributes that make them stand out. Sometimes it’s just the way they stand. Sometimes their hairstyle is unconventional. Find what’s key about a character and get rid of what’s common.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINEOne of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.Normand

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINE

One of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.

Normand

spx:

Here’s the thing!

spx:

CHRIST! SCHWEITZER JUST WHIPPED OUT THE GODDAMN ROSETTA STONE, Y’ALL!

fauxboy:

schweizercomics:

Cleaning out my filing cabinet, I found this handout that I made for my mini-comics class. Hope it’s helpful! Remember, it ain’t only for comics. Self-publish short stories, collections of drawings or sketches, or blank for journals/sketchbooks, etc.

Good notes!